Veracity Products

Superior High Quality Third Party Tested CBD Products

When you can count on quality

CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts

Shop – Veracity CBD Products

Experience the Difference

medical-cannabis-cbd -500mg

Health and Wellness

It’s all about you – CBD products

CBD - High-Quality CBD Products

Experience the Difference

High Quality – Premium CBD

CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts

Shop – Veracity CBD Products

Experience the Difference

Ghost Hunting Mug - I'd Rather Be Ghost Hunting

Shop Ghost Hunting Products

It’s all about you – CBD products

Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts

Shop Photography Gear

High Quality – Premium CBD

WHY CHOOSE WATER SOLUBLE CBD?

Science shows that CBD oil is hydrophobic (Water-hating), which means it doesn’t mix well with water.

CBD benefits are better absorbed by the body when formulated into a water-soluble substance. This allows CBD to process more quickly in your system, encouraging more absorption and efficiency.

Many Factors go into Bioavailability

Bioavailability is the rate at which a substance is absorbed. CBD’s bioavailability can be improved by using a water-soluble form over an oil-based form to ensure the user a quicker and more potent experience.

CBD can have decreased absorption due to the first-pass effect. Bioavailability also decreases when product concentration reduces.

Scientists now have the technology to turn CBD into a hydrophilic compound, making it easier to absorb by the body. They use chemicals and tiny particles (such as ions or molecules) usually integrated into the water to turn CBD into something the body can absorb much more easily.

CBD molecules are coated with agents and emulsifiers, giving them a water-soluble form. This way, our body can more easily absorb the molecules when dissolved in water.

A breakthrough in CBD technology has happened through a method called nanotechnology. Scientists break down CBD clusters with soundwaves, producing particles the size of micros (one billionth of 1 meter).

The particles of CBD can be shrunk to the point that they will dissolve in water. Remember that CBD is an oil that will rest on the water’s surface. This means it takes longer for the body to process before the effects are seen.

Small particles of CBD oil allow for greater bioavailability, as the CBD can mix into the water and is easier to absorb. This has up to five times more bioavailability than regular CBD oil in its original form.

In Conclusion

This new technology will increase CBD’s effectiveness and change how consumers use CBD. It allows them to get more out of their dollar, resulting in less waste than other consumption methods.

One of the most important things you must look for in a high-quality CBD product is third-party testing by an outside lab. If it is not third-party tested, it may be an inferior product.

We ensure that every product we offer meets the highest standard of quality. Our products are made in GMP-certified facilities and are third-party lab tested. Our products deliver the results you are looking for; a pure, clean, quality oil that is safe and effective.  Our products do not contain any heavy metals.

The second most important thing you need to know is the amount of CBD in each product. We provide the exact amount of CBD per dose on every product. Our CBD 1500 Tinicure is a one oz./30ml bottle. It has 30 doses. 1500mg CBD divided by 30 servings per bottle = 50mg CBD per serving. Our 1500 product contains 50 mg of CBD per serving.

Each of our products states on the label how many mg of CBD.

Questions about CBD? Go to our Information page for more details.

About Us

Veracity Products provide only the very highest quality, third-party tested premium products.

CBD is one of more than 112 cannabinoids found in the hemp plant. As CBD is becoming more recognized in the health & wellness world, skincare, personal care, and pet products, many testimonials are already confirming there are many benefits related to CBD but we cannot tell you about them so we do not confirm or deny the benefits. So why the hell are we selling this stuff if we are not allowed to tell you what it does? Now out of principle, we will find ways to sell even more.

CBD can help provide things for all kinds of things we are not allowed to tell you about per our merchant service, so therefore our search engine optimization for keywords will be extremely low, and no one will find our page. But somehow you got here. Thank you for coming.

The cabal runs the planet now. The pharmaceutical companies rule the government. They have infiltrated our government, and they are trying to destroy the competition with the toxic ineffective chemicals they call medicine. The cabal has always suppressed CBD; even when it is legal, they are still using unscrupulous, malicious tactics against the CBD industry. So, I cannot tell you anything about our product and why you should take it. You will have to research on your own. Welcome to communism.

CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts
CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts
CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts
CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts
CBD Products Specialty Products, T-shirts, mugs, sweatshirts

High Quality Third-Party Tested CBD Products

Does CBD make you high?

CBD is entirely different than THC. It is not psychoactive. It does not produce a “high” effect on a person’s state of mind.  CBD influences the body to use its own endocannabinoids more effectively.

CBD activates or inhibits other compounds in the endocannabinoid system.

For example, CBD stops the body from absorbing anandamide, a compound associated with regulating pain. So, increased levels of anandamide in the bloodstream may reduce the amount of pain a person feels.

These are some studies that show Cannabidiol’s effects on inflammation in the brain and nervous system. You can read about what it does in people experiencing pain, insomnia, and certain immune-system responses.

Stay up to date with our Newsletter

Subscribe for Discount Coupons

0 + 3 = ?

FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) DISCLOSURE

The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act require this notice.

+ 101 Sources

Peer-reviewed studies and academic research from medical associations and institutions.

  1. Office of the Commissioner (2020). FDA Approves First Drug Comprised of an Active Ingredient Derived from Marijuana to Treat Rare, Severe Forms of Epilepsy. [online] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-drug-comprised-active-ingredient-derived-marijuana-treat-rare-severe-forms [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  2. ‌Corroon, J. and Phillips, J.A. (2018). A Cross-Sectional Study of Cannabidiol Users. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, [online] 3(1), pp.152–161. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6043845// [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  3. ‌Office of the Commissioner (2021). Better Data for a Better Understanding of Cannabidiol (CBD) Products. [online] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/fda-voices/better-data-better-understanding-use-and-safety-profile-cannabidiol-cbd-products [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  4. ‌National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and Evidence, A. (2017). Cannabis. [online] Nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK425762/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  5. ‌Grinspoon, P. (2018). Cannabidiol (CBD)-what we know and what we don’t – Harvard Health. [online] Harvard Health. Available at: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cannabidiol-cbd-what-we-know-and-what-we-dont-2018082414476 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  6. Zou, S. and Kumar, U. (2018). Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, [online] 19(3), p.833. Available at: https://www.sativaisticated.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Cannabinoid-Receptors-and-the-Endocannabinoid-System-Signaling-and-Function-in-the-Central-Nervous-System-Medical-Cannabis-Medical-Marijuana-Research-for-the-Central-Nervous-System-CNS.pdf.
  7. ‌Office of the Commissioner (2021). FDA Regulation of Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Products: Q&A. [online] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/fda-regulation-cannabis-and-cannabis-derived-products-including-cannabidiol-cbd#farmbill [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  8. ‌Lattanzi, S., Brigo, F., Trinka, E., Zaccara, G., Cagnetti, C., Del Giovane, C. and Silvestrini, M. (2018). Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol in Epilepsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Drugs, [online] 78(17), pp.1791–1804. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30390221/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  9. ‌Office of the Commissioner (2021). FDA Regulation of Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Products: Q&A. [online] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available at: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/fda-regulation-cannabis-and-cannabis-derived-products-including-cannabidiol-cbd#:~:text=FDA%20has%20approved%20Epidiolex%2C%20which%20contains%20a%20purified,is%20safe%20and%20effective%20for%20its%20intended%20use. [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  10. ‌HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION These highlights do not include all the information needed to use EPIDIOLEX ® safely and effectively. See full prescribing information for EPIDIOLEX. EPIDIOLEX ® (cannabidiol) oral solution. (n.d.). [online] Available at: https://www.epidiolex.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/1021/EPX-03633-1021_EPIDIOLEX_(cannabidiol)_USPI.pdf [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  11. ‌Skelley, J.W., Deas, C.M., Curren, Z. and Ennis, J. (2020). Use of cannabidiol in anxiety and anxiety-related disorders. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, [online] 60(1), pp.253–261. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31866386/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  12. ‌Masataka, N. (2019). Anxiolytic Effects of Repeated Cannabidiol Treatment in Teenagers With Social Anxiety Disorders. Frontiers in Psychology, [online] 10. Available at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02466/full [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  13. ‌Lee, J.L.C., Bertoglio, L.J., Guimarães, F.S. and Stevenson, C.W. (2017). Cannabidiol regulation of emotion and emotional memory processing: relevance for treating anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders. British Journal of Pharmacology, [online] 174(19), pp.3242–3256. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28268256/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  14. ‌https://www.facebook.com/NIDANIH (2015). The Biology and Potential Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol. [online] Drugabuse.gov. Available at: https://archives.drugabuse.gov/testimonies/2015/biology-potential-therapeutic-effects-cannabidiol [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  15. Shannon, S. (2019). Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series. The Permanente Journal, [online] 23. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326553/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  16. ‌Pahwa, R., Amandeep Goyal, Pankaj Bansal and Ishwarlal Jialal (2021). Chronic Inflammation. [online] Nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  17. ‌Atalay, S., Jarocka-Karpowicz, I. and Skrzydlewska, E. (2019). Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol. Antioxidants, [online] 9(1), p.21. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7023045/#B135-antioxidants-09-00021 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  18. ‌Xiong, W., Cui, T., Cheng, K., Yang, F., Chen, S.-R., Willenbring, D., Guan, Y., Pan, H.-L., Ren, K., Xu, Y. and Zhang, L. (2012). Cannabinoids suppress inflammatory and neuropathic pain by targeting α3 glycine receptors. Journal of Experimental Medicine, [online] 209(6), pp.1121–1134. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3371734/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  19. ‌Nagarkatti, P., Pandey, R., Rieder, S.A., Hegde, V.L. and Nagarkatti, M. (2009). Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Future Medicinal Chemistry, [online] 1(7), pp.1333–1349. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2828614/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  20. ‌Sawtelle, L. and Holle, L.M. (2020). Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids in Patients With Cancer. Annals of Pharmacotherapy, [online] 55(7), pp.870–890. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33070617/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  21. ‌Blake, A., Bo Angela Wan, Malek, L., DeAngelis, C., Diaz, P., Lao, N., Chow, E. and O’Hearn, S. (2018). A selective review of medical cannabis in cancer pain management. Annals of Palliative Medicine, [online] 6(2), pp.S215–S222S21S222. Available at: https://apm.amegroups.com/article/view/16199/18209 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  22. ‌Rock, E.M., Sticht, M.A., Limebeer, C.L. and Parker, L.A. (2016). Cannabinoid Regulation of Acute and Anticipatory Nausea. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, [online] 1(1), pp.113–121. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5576606/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  23. ‌Likar, R., Köstenberger, M. and Nahler, G. (2020). Cannabidiol bei Tumorerkrankungen. Der Schmerz, [online] 34(2), pp.117–122. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31897700/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  24. ‌Parker, L.A., Rock, E.M. and Limebeer, C.L. (2011). Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids. British Journal of Pharmacology, [online] 163(7), pp.1411–1422. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3165951/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  25. ‌Singh, S.K. and Dixit, T. (2014). Pharmacogenomics in Anesthesia. Handbook of Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine, [online] pp.815–833. Available at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/ondansetron [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  26. ‌Clinicaltrials.gov. (2019). Cannabis For Cancer-Related Symptoms – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov. [online] Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03948074 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  27. ‌Seltzer, E.S., Watters, A.K., MacKenzie, D., Granat, L.M. and Zhang, D. (2020). Cannabidiol (CBD) as a Promising Anti-Cancer Drug. Cancers, [online] 12(11), p.3203. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7693730/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  28. ‌Dall’Stella, P.B., Docema, M.F.L., Maldaun, M.V.C., Feher, O. and Lancellotti, C.L.P. (2019). Case Report: Clinical Outcome and Image Response of Two Patients With Secondary High-Grade Glioma Treated With Chemoradiation, PCV, and Cannabidiol. Frontiers in Oncology, [online] 8. Available at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc.2018.00643/full [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  29. ‌Sulé-Suso, J., Watson, N.A., van Pittius, D.G. and Jegannathen, A. (2019). Striking lung cancer response to self-administration of cannabidiol: A case report and literature review. SAGE Open Medical Case Reports, [online] 7, p.2050313X1983216. Available at: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2050313X19832160 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  30. ‌Anon, (2021). Drug Overdose Deaths. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/deaths/index.html [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  31. ‌Medicare Coverable Services for Integrative and Non- pharmacological Chronic Pain Management PROVIDER TYPES AFFECTED. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Medicare-Learning-Network-MLN/MLNMattersArticles/Downloads/SE19008.pdf.
  32. ‌Vučković, S., Srebro, D., Vujović, K.S., Vučetić, Č. and Prostran, M. (2018). Cannabinoids and Pain: New Insights From Old Molecules. Frontiers in Pharmacology, [online] 9. Available at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphar.2018.01259/full [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  33. ‌Nih.gov. (2021). Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. [online] Available at: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Hope-Through-Research/Multiple-Sclerosis-Hope-Through-Research#:~:text=As%20the%20disease%20progresses%2C%20the%20outermost%20layer%20of,the%20attack%20on%20myelin%20by%20the%20immune%20system. [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  34. ‌Clinicaltrials.gov. (2011). Sativex® for Relieving Persistent Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov. [online] Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01361607 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  35. ‌None, P.C. (2018). Sativex for the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Issues in emerging health technologies, [online] (72). Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16317825/#:~:text=Sativex%20%28R%29%20is%20a%20cannabis-based%20pharmaceutical%20product%20containing,neuropathic%20pain%20in%20patients%20with%20multiple%20sclerosis%20%28MS%29. [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  36. ‌Russo, E. (2008). Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, [online] Volume 4, pp.245–259. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2503660/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  37. ‌Celius, E.G. and Vila, C. (2018). The influence of THC:CBD oromucosal spray on driving ability in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity. Brain and Behavior, [online] 8(5), p.e00962. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29761015/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  38. ‌Rudroff, T. and Sosnoff, J. (2018). Cannabidiol to Improve Mobility in People with Multiple Sclerosis. Frontiers in Neurology, [online] 9. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5874292/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  39. ‌NCCIH. (2018). Cannabis (Marijuana) and Cannabinoids: What You Need To Know. [online] Available at: https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/cannabis-marijuana-and-cannabinoids-what-you-need-to-know [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  40. ‌Meng, H., Johnston, B., Englesakis, M., Moulin, D.E. and Bhatia, A. (2017). Selective Cannabinoids for Chronic Neuropathic Pain. Anesthesia & Analgesia, [online] 125(5), pp.1638–1652. Available at: https://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Fulltext/2017/11000/Selective_Cannabinoids_for_Chronic_Neuropathic.32.aspx [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  41. ‌Vučković, S., Srebro, D., Vujović, K.S., Vučetić, Č. and Prostran, M. (2018). Cannabinoids and Pain: New Insights From Old Molecules. Frontiers in Pharmacology, [online] 9. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6277878/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  42. ‌Meng, H., Johnston, B., Englesakis, M., Moulin, D.E. and Bhatia, A. (2017). Selective Cannabinoids for Chronic Neuropathic Pain. Anesthesia & Analgesia, [online] 125(5), pp.1638–1652. Available at: https://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Fulltext/2017/11000/Selective_Cannabinoids_for_Chronic_Neuropathic.32.aspx [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  43. ‌Larsen, C. and Shahinas, J. (2020). Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research, 12(3), pp.129–141.
  44. ‌American Journal of Psychiatry. (2019). Cannabidiol for the Reduction of Cue-Induced Craving and Anxiety in Drug-Abstinent Individuals With Heroin Use Disorder: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial | American Journal of Psychiatry. [online] Available at: https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18101191?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%20%200pubmed [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  45. ‌Bíró, T., Tóth, B.I., Haskó, G., Paus, R. and Pacher, P. (2009). The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, [online] 30(8), pp.411–420. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757311/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  46. ‌Scheau, C., Badarau, I.A., Mihai, L.-G., Scheau, A.-E., Costache, D.O., Constantin, C., Calina, D., Caruntu, C., Costache, R.S. and Caruntu, A. (2020). Cannabinoids in the Pathophysiology of Skin Inflammation. Molecules, [online] 25(3), p.652. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7037408/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  47. ‌Tóth, K., Ádám, D., Bíró, T. and Oláh, A. (2019). Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the “C(ut)annabinoid” System. Molecules, [online] 24(5), p.918. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6429381/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  48. ‌Iffland, K. and Grotenhermen, F. (2017). An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, [online] 2(1), pp.139–154. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5569602/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  49. ‌Atalay, S., Jarocka-Karpowicz, I. and Skrzydlewska, E. (2019). Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol. Antioxidants, [online] 9(1), p.21. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7023045/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  50. ‌Grinspoon, P. (2018). Cannabidiol (CBD)-what we know and what we don’t – Harvard Health. [online] Harvard Health. Available at: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/cannabidiol-cbd-what-we-know-and-what-we-dont-2018082414476 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  51. ‌Oláh, A., Tóth, B.I., Borbíró, I., Sugawara, K., Szöllõsi, A.G., Czifra, G., Pál, B., Ambrus, L., Kloepper, J., Camera, E., Ludovici, M., Picardo, M., Voets, T., Zouboulis, C.C., Paus, R. and Bíró, T. (2014). Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes. Journal of Clinical Investigation, [online] 124(9), pp.3713–3724. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25061872/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  52. ‌Andre, C.M., Hausman, J.-F. and Guerriero, G. (2016). Cannabis sativa: The Plant of the Thousand and One Molecules. Frontiers in Plant Science, [online] 7. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740396/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  53. ‌Anon, (2021). Arthritis Related Statistics. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/arthritis-related-stats.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  54. ‌Arthritis.org. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/managing-pain/pain-relief-solutions/cbd-for-arthritis-pain [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  55. ‌Arthritis.org. (2019). [online] Available at: https://www.arthritis.org/advocate/issue-briefs/cbd-guidance-adults-arthritis [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  56. ‌Philpott, H.T., O’Brien, M. and McDougall, J.J. (2017). Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis. Pain, [online] 158(12), pp.2442–2451. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28885454/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  57. ‌Anon, (2021). Lupus. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/lupus/index.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  58. ‌Anon, (2021). Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/lupus/facts/detailed.html#sle [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  59. ‌Li, H., Kong, W., Chambers, C.R., Yu, D., Ganea, D., Tuma, R.F. and Ward, S.J. (2018). The non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) attenuates pro-inflammatory mediators, T cell infiltration, and thermal sensitivity following spinal cord injury in mice. Cellular Immunology, [online] 329, pp.1–9. Available at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0008874918300911?via%3Dihub [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  60. ‌National Cancer Institute. (2021). NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms. [online] Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/t-cell [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  61. ‌The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. (2019). Cannabidiol in the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Series | The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. [online] Available at: https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/acm.2018.0437?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&/= [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  62. ‌Batalla, A., Bos, J., Postma, A. and Bossong, M.G. (2021). The Impact of Cannabidiol on Human Brain Function: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, [online] 11. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33551817/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  63. ‌Nih.gov. (2021). NLM Support Center  · NLM Customer Support Center. [online] Available at: https://support.nlm.nih.gov/?style=classic&deptID=28049?Ncbi_App=pmc&Db=pmc&Page=exception&Snapshot=%252Fprojects%252FPMC%252FPMCViewer@4.52&Time=2021-11-17T04:35:09-05:00&Host=ptpmc101&ncbi_phid=8A1AC7F6194BE1810000000005D305D2&ncbi_session=84477D07191A7BB3_28765SID&from=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov%252Fpmc%252Farticles%252FPMC5938896%252Fpdf%252FSNI-9-91.pdfhttps%253A%252Fwww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov%252Fpmc%252Farticles%252FPMC5938896%252Fpdf%252FSNI-9-91.pdf [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  64. Maroon, J. and Bost, J. (2018). Review of the neurological benefits of phytocannabinoids. Surgical Neurology International, [online] 9(1), p.91. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5938896/.
  65. ‌ScienceDaily. (2021). CBD reduces plaque, improves cognition in model of familial Alzheimer’s. [online] Available at: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/03/210309192548.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  66. ‌Clinicaltrials.gov. (2020). Effects of THC-Free CBD Oil on Agitation in Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov. [online] Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04436081 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  67. ‌NCCIH. (2011). Antioxidants: In Depth. [online] Available at: https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/antioxidants-in-depth [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  68. ‌Pereira, Sónia R., Hackett, B., O’Driscoll, David N., Sun, M. and Downer, Eric J. (2021). Cannabidiol modulation of oxidative stress and signalling. Neuronal Signaling, [online] 5(3). Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8385185/pdf/ns-05-ns20200080C.pdf.
  69. ‌Atalay, S., Jarocka-Karpowicz, I. and Skrzydlewska, E. (2019). Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol. Antioxidants, [online] 9(1), p.21. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31881765/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  70. ‌Liguori, I., Russo, G., Curcio, F., Bulli, G., Aran, L., Della-Morte, D., Gargiulo, G., Testa, G., Cacciatore, F., Bonaduce, D. and Abete, P. (2018). Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clinical Interventions in Aging, [online] Volume 13, pp.757–772. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29731617/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  71. ‌Rajesh, M., Mukhopadhyay, P., Bátkai, S., Patel, V., Saito, K., Matsumoto, S., Kashiwaya, Y., Horváth, B., Mukhopadhyay, B., Becker, L., Haskó, G., Liaudet, L., Wink, D.A., Veves, A., Mechoulam, R. and Pacher, P. (2010). Cannabidiol Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, Fibrosis, and Inflammatory and Cell Death Signaling Pathways in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, [online] 56(25), pp.2115–2125. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026637/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  72. ‌Batalla, A., Janssen, H., Gangadin, S.S. and Bossong, M.G. (2019). The Potential of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Psychosis and Addiction: Who Benefits Most? A Systematic Review. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(7), p.1058.
  73. ‌Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology Special Collection. (n.d.). [online] Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6843725/pdf/10.1177_2045125319881916.pdf.
  74. ‌Larsen, C. and Shahinas, J. (2020). Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research, 12(3), pp.129–141.
  75. ‌Stampanoni Bassi, M., Gilio, L., Maffei, P., Dolcetti, E., Bruno, A., Buttari, F., Centonze, D. and Iezzi, E. (2018). Exploiting the Multifaceted Effects of Cannabinoids on Mood to Boost Their Therapeutic Use Against Anxiety and Depression. Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, [online] 11. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6256035/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  76. ‌CDC (2021). Heart Disease Facts. [online] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  77. ‌Rajesh, M., Mukhopadhyay, P., Bátkai, S., Patel, V., Saito, K., Matsumoto, S., Kashiwaya, Y., Horváth, B., Mukhopadhyay, B., Becker, L., Haskó, G., Liaudet, L., Wink, D.A., Veves, A., Mechoulam, R. and Pacher, P. (2010). Cannabidiol Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, Fibrosis, and Inflammatory and Cell Death Signaling Pathways in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, [online] 56(25), pp.2115–2125. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026637/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  78. ‌Journal of Dietary Supplements. (2020). Effects of Hemp Extract on Markers of Wellness, Stress Resilience, Recovery and Clinical Biomarkers of Safety in Overweight, But Otherwise Healthy Subjects. [online] Available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19390211.2020.1765941?journalCode=ijds20& [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  79. ‌CDC (2020). LDL & HDL: Good & Bad Cholesterol. [online] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/cholesterol/ldl_hdl.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  80. ‌www.heart.org. (2017). What is Cardiovascular Disease? [online] Available at: https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  81. ‌www.heart.org. (2017). What is Cardiovascular Disease? [online] Available at: https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  82. ‌Stanley, C.P., Hind, W.H. and O’Sullivan, S.E. (2013). Is the cardiovascular system a therapeutic target for cannabidiol? British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, [online] 75(2), pp.313–322. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22670794/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  83. ‌Scharf, E.L. (2017). Translating Endocannabinoid Biology into Clinical Practice: Cannabidiol for Stroke Prevention. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, [online] 2(1), pp.259–264. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29098188/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  84. ‌Furgiuele, A., Cosentino, M., Ferrari, M. and Marino, F. (2021). Immunomodulatory Potential of Cannabidiol in Multiple Sclerosis: a Systematic Review. Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology, [online] 16(2), pp.251–269. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7829325/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  85. ‌Anon, (2021). Conditions That Increase Risk for Stroke. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/conditions.htm [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  86. ‌Jadoon, K.A., Tan, G.D. and O’Sullivan, S.E. (2017). A single dose of cannabidiol reduces blood pressure in healthy volunteers in a randomized crossover study. JCI Insight, [online] 2(12). Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5470879/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  87. ‌Baranowska-Kuczko, M., Kozłowska, H., Kloza, M., Sadowska, O., Kozłowski, M., Kusaczuk, M., Kasacka, I. and Malinowska, B. (2020). Vasodilatory effects of cannabidiol in human pulmonary and rat small mesenteric arteries: modification by hypertension and the potential pharmacological opportunities. Journal of Hypertension, [online] 38(5), pp.896–911. Available at: https://journals.lww.com/jhypertension/Fulltext/2020/05000/Vasodilatory_effects_of_cannabidiol_in_human.16.aspx [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  88. ‌Weiss, L., Zeira, M., Reich, S., Har-Noy, M., Mechoulam, R., Slavin, S. and Gallily, R. (2006). Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Autoimmunity, [online] 39(2), pp.143–151. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16698671/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  89. ‌Bielawiec, P., Harasim-Symbor, E. and Chabowski, A. (2020). Phytocannabinoids: Useful Drugs for the Treatment of Obesity? Special Focus on Cannabidiol. Frontiers in Endocrinology, [online] 11. Available at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2020.00114/full [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  90. ‌Jadoon, K.A., Ratcliffe, S.H., Barrett, D.A., Thomas, E.L., Stott, C., Bell, J.D., O’Sullivan, S.E. and Tan, G.D. (2016). Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol and Tetrahydrocannabivarin on Glycemic and Lipid Parameters in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Pilot Study. Diabetes Care, [online] 39(10), pp.1777–1786. Available at: https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1777 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  91. ‌Diabetes.org. (2021). CBD & Diabetes | ADA. [online] Available at: https://www.diabetes.org/healthy-living/medication-treatments/cbd-diabetes [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  92. ‌Farrimond, J.A., Whalley, B.J. and Williams, C.M. (2012). Cannabinol and cannabidiol exert opposing effects on rat feeding patterns. Psychopharmacology, [online] 223(1), pp.117–129. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22543671/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  93. ‌Ignatowska-Jankowska, B., Jankowski, M.M. and Swiergiel, A.H. (2011). Cannabidiol decreases body weight gain in rats: Involvement of CB2 receptors. Neuroscience Letters, [online] 490(1), pp.82–84. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21172406/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  94. ‌Parray, H.A. and Yun, J.W. (2016). Cannabidiol promotes browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, [online] 416(1-2), pp.131–139. Available at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11010-016-2702-5 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  95. ‌Elattar, S. and Satyanarayana, A. (2015). Can Brown Fat Win the Battle Against White Fat? Journal of Cellular Physiology, [online] 230(10), pp.2311–2317. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4481171/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  96. ‌Russo, E.B. (2016). Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency Reconsidered: Current Research Supports the Theory in Migraine, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowel, and Other Treatment-Resistant Syndromes. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, [online] 1(1), pp.154–165. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5576607/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  97. ‌Martínez, V., Iriondo De-Hond, A., Borrelli, F., Capasso, R., del Castillo, M.D. and Abalo, R. (2020). Cannabidiol and Other Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids for Prevention and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders: Useful Nutraceuticals? International Journal of Molecular Sciences, [online] 21(9). Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7246936/.
  98. De Filippis, D., Esposito, G., Cirillo, C., Cipriano, M., De Winter, B.Y., Scuderi, C., Sarnelli, G., Cuomo, R., Steardo, L., De Man, J.G. and Iuvone, T. (2011). Cannabidiol Reduces Intestinal Inflammation through the Control of Neuroimmune Axis. PLoS ONE, [online] 6(12), p.e28159. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22163000/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  99. ‌Robinson, D. (2020). Pioneering UAMS Study Warns of CBD Supplements’ Harm to Gut Health. [online] UAMS News. Available at: https://news.uams.edu/2020/06/04/pioneering-uams-study-warns-of-cbd-supplements-harm-to-gut-health/ [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  100. ‌Kogan, N.M., Melamed, E., Wasserman, E., Raphael, B., Breuer, A., Stok, K.S., Sondergaard, R., Escudero, A.Vv., Baraghithy, S., Attar-Namdar, M., Friedlander-Barenboim, S., Mathavan, N., Isaksson, H., Mechoulam, R., Müller, R., Bajayo, A., Gabet, Y. and Bab, I. (2015). Cannabidiol, a Major Non-Psychotropic Cannabis Constituent Enhances Fracture Healing and Stimulates Lysyl Hydroxylase Activity in Osteoblasts. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, [online] 30(10), pp.1905–1913. Available at: https://asbmr.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jbmr.2513 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].
  101. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. (2017). An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies | Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. [online] Available at: https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2016.0034 [Accessed 02 Jan. 2022].

Veracity Products Sold by Extra Eyes